News

The Evolution of E-mail Marketing

Posted in News on 22 May 2015

In a digital world that is so frequently changing, for businesses to stay successful in the marketplace, it’s necessary to implement not only the best practices, but the most up-to-date tactics. With e-mail marketing, there are several things to consider to ensure that you’re being as effective with your efforts as possible. 

Personalization

When e-mail campaigns were first introduced into a coherent online marketing strategy, how data was received and categorized was very basic when compared to the data you can get today. In the past, e-mail personalization was done manually, and would often be a process where someone had to spend hours upon hours finding out how customers signed up for something on the website and then finding a related e-mail to send as a follow up. Now, it is relatively simple and completely automatic to determine how users signed up for something on your website, the time spent on the website, and even something as intricate as the navigation flow taken by users. Through automated personalization and automation, this process has been completely streamlined. While this method may take some effort initially to set up e-mail triggers and workflows as well as build out lists, it leads to a far more personalized e-mail experience with higher open rates, click-through-rates, and a more tailored experience for each individual user than ever before.

Load Time

When e-mail marketing was first introduced, it was largely text-based, and as a result there were few issues with load time. As discussed above, most e-mails now have visuals involved. For an industry like IT, where you’re selling services that are highly correlated with the Internet, your e-mails should be a good reflection of your strengths and expertise—so you shouldn’t have slow load times when someone opens your e-mails. If you’re a company that uses large amounts of images in your e-mails, you want to make sure that it won’t impact the user experience and leave users waiting for 15 seconds before the e-mail loads. Putting images through programs like ‘Optimizely’ (https://www.optimizely.com/) that optimizes visuals to be the smallest size possible, while still retaining quality, enhances the load time as much as possible.

Scheduling

Understanding the need for appropriate timing of e-mails is essential to the success of your business’ overall e-mail efforts. Previously, sending e-mails once a day offering certain deals or exclusives was acceptable. Today, these best practices are vastly different. The threshold for an email to be considered spam is a lot higher than it used to be, and sending e-mails multiple times a week will likely result in your messages being treated as spam. Focusing on the schedule of your e-mails as well as the value and relevancy of the content you’re sending is crucial and will make all the difference with open rates and deliverability. Constantly inundating users with email will also hurt your overall brand credibility, and hurt existing email campaigns and any other campaigns you might use going forward.

Coding

When your e-mails are being accessed on different platforms, you need to think about how it will look on each of them to confirm that you’re reaching your audience effectively. In the past, there were less platforms, and it was relatively simple to do a quick check on major e-mail platforms like AOL, Yahoo, Gmail, to see if your e-mail looked as it should. With so many different platforms and devices in the marketplace today, this is no longer the case and you need to be optimizing your messages for nearly every platform and device imaginable. Using a tool like MailChimp to identify what devices the majority of your e-mail list uses, and then making sure that your newsletters work well on those platforms is a good way to “double check” that you’re reaching almost everyone in your demographic. E-mails that don’t render properly leave a lasting negative impression for users and bad emails that look amateurish on certain platforms will ruin brand credibility in the eyes of your audience.

Layout

When the e-mail space was relatively new, a lot of B2Bs used text-only e-mails when doing e-mail campaigns. The idea was to make it look like a standard, personalized e-mail as much as possible by using standard text and strong, captivating copy that would make users want to convert. While this is still a method used by many companies (particularly in the B2B and service verticals), for most companies selling a product you need to have imagery that shows the product or service your email is trying to sell. E-mails that are image-based should be treated similar to a Web page, with a main call-to-action button, and visuals that attract attention to a certain goal you’re trying to accomplish. If you have too many images and users have to scroll down to reach your main call-to-action, you’re going to lose their attention, and they will be less inclined to convert.

Source

How to Develop Click-Worthy SEO Boosting Content

Posted in Tips on 22 May 2015

Virtually anybody who has spent a decent amount of time learning about SEO and the related tactics knows that the game is constantly morphing. One thing that hasn’t changed, however, is that quality content is a must. In fact, unique and relevant material is more important now than ever before considering that content can no longer simply be stuffed with keywords and phrases and expected to excel.

These days, time needs to be spent to craft a genuinely click-worthy piece of content that is not only useful but compelling as well. The internet is bursting at the seams with quality content and information. If the copy that you develop is lack-luster or sub-par, it will simply float out into the ethers of the internet, rarely to be seen by human eyes. In other words, you’ll waste a lot of time and precious resources unless you learn to wow your readers.

In an effort to help write some of the most compelling and clickable content on the internet, here are 4 of today’s best practices and most important guidelines for generating stellar content:

The Audience Comes First

This may seem like a no-brainer, but there is still an absurd amount of keyword-riddled content posted online that caters more to the bots that crawl the articles than to the people that actually read the pieces. Not only will this style of writing deter many potential prospects from reading your material or shopping with your brand, but this will actually damage your SEO efforts. Google has the ability to identify these types of posts and will purposefully downgrade a site’s ranking for posting such material.

Now, this is not to say that keywords are no longer critical, as they most definitely still are. The trick here is to weave these words into the piece in a natural and flowing way.

Instead of catering to Google-bots, ensure that the content generated is unique, relevant, and most of all, useful to the audience it is aimed at. In this digital era, there is a bounty of various tools and applications available online that can assist writers in creating outright great content. Tools like the Hemingway Editor are great for keeping content focused and precise for your audience.

Craft Headlines for Click-ability

Headlines are one of the most important elements to focus on when creating a great piece of content. Before the viewer will even consider reading an article, the headline has to grab them and incite genuine curiosity. If your posts have ho-hum titles, the traffic will reflect the lackluster language. Likewise, never ever mislead your readers with a subject that doesn’t deliver. You won’t maintain repeat traffic with methods that don’t have integrity at their core.

Since the headline of the article will be the first impression of what is to come, it is crucial that these attention-grabbers be optimized to include keywords, incite interest, and make light of how this could improve the reader’s life. How to articles, infographics, and list articles are click mongers, as a rule.

Check out some of the most popular blogs in your niche to gain a better understanding of what kinds of content is posted and how exactly the headlines are crafted. Someone has cracked the code to reach your target audience; see what’s worked for them and get inspired.

Build Up Proper Links

Amassing proper backlinks for your site and content can be somewhat time consuming, although it is absolutely necessary to increase your SEO ranking and to help establish a reputable and respected online name. By linking to various blogs, social media platforms, and fellow writer’s pages, you’re increasing awareness of your own content and efforts as well as establishing more credibility and authority. This in turn will directly affect how your company ranks in the SERPs. Remember that the development of compelling content becomes even more important with link building because no one will want to send their visitors to mediocre material.

One word to the wise: Only link to sites that are both relevant to your industry and high quality. Links for the sake of links is one sure way to see your rankings drop. It’s a black hat tactic and it will get you in hot water eventually. Make every link count, and your results will reflect these efforts.

Images, Videos, and Gifs

Content with eye-catching images have come to rule the social stratosphere. Images, gifs, videos, or any other form of visual presentation are now an imperative factor to posting content. With the huge amount of digital clutter running amuck, content without an image, video, or something else to draw the eyes of potential readers often remains invisible. Select high-resolution, interesting, and relevant images for the content that will be posted to ensure you’re catching your audience’s attention and getting them to click on your content in droves.

The creation of quality content is likely something that will never change as a “golden rule” of SEO performance. As time goes on, the rules of creating this content only become more refined and structured. Without a doubt, this trend will only deepen, making it imperative for business owners to follow suit and write genuinely interesting content for audiences. With the basic guidelines laid out above, you will be well on your way to generating some of the most useful, compelling, and clickable content around.

Source

The secret to building startup buzz online

Posted in Tips on 18 May 2015

There’s a lot being published these days about how to break into noisy digital environments and capture the interest of people whose attention spans are shorter than ever.

Yes, you can achieve this goal with things like paid Facebook ads and sponsored tweets. You can do it by pushing content on native advertising platforms like Outbrain and Taboola.

But I’m going to let you in on a little secret… There’s another approach that’s guaranteed to help your startup build buzz without the time and expense associated with digital marketing campaigns. If you really want to make a splash, what you need is an army of advocates.

Think about Apple’s fanboys. How many additional sales do you think Apple made – not because their products were the best, but because the social buzz surrounding them was so strong that people just had to be a part of it?

Every loyal brand advocate is a walking, talking advertisement for your company. And when you consider that 84 percent of respondents in Nielsen’s latest Trust in Advertising report cite word-of-mouth recommendations from friends and family members as the most trustworthy source of advertising, it’s clear that these power users have the potential to pay off big for your brand.

But the best news? Building an army of these advocates is easier than you think. Here’s how four entrepreneurs and startups are leveraging the power of social advocacy:

Noah Kagan

Noah Kagan is pretty much an internet business legend at this point, but if you aren’t familiar with his work, he was employee #30 at Facebook, and is consistently ranked one of the best growth hackers working today.

With credentials like that, you’d expect that Noah would have locked himself away in a tower by now – spending his days counting stacks of money – but instead, he’s currently the Chief Sumo at AppSumo, his tech tools startup that offers products at extremely low (and sometimes free) prices.

Giving away great products at a great price certainly goes a long way towards delighting customers and converting fans into brand advocates, but Noah doesn’t stop there. Consider the following anecdote from Danny Boice of Speek:

“At Speek, we use AppSumo religiously for great deals on the tools we use to run our business. One day, I got a box from Noah Kagan (the CEO of AppSumo) that contained some amazing cookies—completely out of the blue! It was a random, simple gesture that meant so much to me as a loyal customer. I thought it was absolutely brilliant of Noah to do this.”

Losing a customer here and there won’t break Noah, but it’s not just about the money for him. It’s about finding fun and exciting ways to connect with his clients – and that’s something you can do as well.

Tip: Send swag to loyal customers

The great thing about sending small gifts to customers is that it really is the thought that counts. You don’t need to send something big to make an impression – even a simple, handwritten card is enough to stand out, brighten people’s day and turn them into the kind of customers that’ll go on to recommend your products to everyone you meet.

Buffer

Few startups take sending gifts of swag more seriously than Buffer. The company employs a dedicated Community Champion – Nicole Miller – who spends 50-60 percent of her time “managing swag stock, packaging writing cards and gathering addresses.” Miller estimates that she spends 1-1.5 days a week where her entire focus is “Buffer love.”

So what does that translate to in real terms? Miller estimates that her office ships out 40 to 60 cards and packages a week, for a total of more than 1,200 hand-written cards, gifts and more.

Miller also provides a helpful breakdown of the costs associated with all of this mailing:

  • Notecards – $.92 per card/envelope (+$.49 domestic mailing)
  • T-shirts – $9.47 per shirt (+ $5.00 domestic mailing)
  • Hoodies – $23.07 per hoodie (+$8.00-$15.00 domestic mailing)
  • Moleskine notebooks – $6.80-$19.74 each (+$2.00-$8.00 domestic mailing)
  • Stickers – $.29-$.56 per sticker
  • Mugs – $9.11 each (+$15.00 domestic mailing)

A full read of Miller’s recent blog post on how Buffer delights its community is well-worth a read, but in the meantime, here’s one of the best takeaway tips for you:

Tip: Listen to your audience

Many of Buffer’s best ideas for sending swag come from checking in on its customers’ social profiles. In one particularly delightful case, the resulting care package wound up being sent not to the customer, but to her dog – with a package full of the dog’s favorite treats and some stickers to give to “her human.”

Neil Patel

Like Noah Kagan, Neil Patel is well-known in digital marketing circles as the founder of KISSMetrics, CrazyEgg and the popular QuickSprout blog.

With all these competing demands, you’d think that Neil would be too busy to connect with everybody who’s interested in engaging with his brand. But take a look at any of his recent blog posts, and you’ll find Neil himself there – responding to each and every comment he receives.

The time costs of doing so are substantial. As of August 20th, 2014, Neil estimated that, to date, he’d responded to 50,969 web comments (plus several thousand others across the web), spending an average of one minute reading and responding to each message.

Sure, Neil admits that there have been financial benefits resulting from this high level of engagement, but even more important is the way that these actions make his customers feel.

Tip: Find a way to help

That’s what it all comes down to for Neil – helping people. Adopt that same philosophy at your startup, and do whatever it takes to help your prospects and customers solve their most pressing problems. Even if you can’t end world hunger or make PC software run smoothly on a Mac, your willingness to help out will leave a lasting impression and go a long way towards converting neutral customers to true brand advocates.

When I Work

At When I Work – an employee scheduling app that helps small business owners create employee schedules in just minutes – we’ve made customer delight a top priority.

The following are just a few of the steps we’ve taken, as well as how they’ve paid off for our business:

  • Whenever our team brings on a new customer, we send out a handwritten thank you card. The cost is virtually nothing, but so far, we’ve seen that the cards are shared about 70 percent of the time on the customer’s social profiles. We’ve also seen our referrals go up by 23 percent since we started doing this.
  • We also send out free branded t-shirts to customers. Of those that have received the shirts, roughly 17 percent have recommended our product to a friend.
  • Finally – and this is one of my favorites – if you ever have an issue with our product, we’ll mail you your favorite candy to ensure that you have the sweetest experience possible with When I Work (get it?).

Again, these aren’t big gestures. A candy bar costs a dollar, and shipping it to a customer isn’t much more than that. But when you consider the financial impact this small gesture could have in terms of customer retention and future referrals, it’s practically a no-brainer.

Tip: Measure the impact of your efforts

I’m a data junkie, but even if you aren’t analytically-inclined, I’d still recommend putting some effort into tracking the impact of your efforts, whether in terms of brand sentiment, conversions or some other metric. Doing so will tell you whether or not your efforts are paying off, as well as whether some types of promotions inspire more positive feelings than others.

Source

How to Track the ROI of Your SEO Content

Posted in Tips on 18 May 2015

You create content for your product because research says you need it. So you might dutifully write blog entries, come up with social media posts, and otherwise create a body of content that meets the standards of the mysterious content demanders that tell you it is the only way to succeed.

But if you write all of this necessary content only to send it out into a dark void, what good does it do you?

It is actually better to have no content than unhelpful content because with no content, at least you are using your time to do other work. Pointless content simply wastes your time.

Four Ways to Dig In and Find Your Content’s Value in ROI

There are many ways to measure your content’s real return on investment, but for starters, here are four things that you really should be doing now.

1. Know How to Evaluate Analytics. In order to properly evaluate analytics, you have to know how to evaluate them. That might seem like common sense, but it is still a major concern.

Here is a short quiz for you:

  1. What is a bounce rate?
  2. How can you use Google Analytics to benchmark your content’s success?
  3. What is a funnel?

Do you know all of the answers? If not (or even if you do), you should be aware that this is just a small sampling of the analytic measures you might want to use to track your content’s success. Google Analytics offers a glossary of their terms to help you figure out what everything means.

To truly evaluate the ins and outs of ROI, you need to have some basic understanding of what analytics are and how to use them. There are many great tools you can use that not only help you learn what analytics are, but will help you to evaluate your specific data.

  • Google Analytics. Google Analytics is probably the most popular of all these tools, and it is likely you have heard of it before. This tool allows you to track content across platforms, meaning both different accounts (e.g., Twitter and Google +) and different access devices (e.g., computers and smartphones). It helps you answer questions such as where customers are coming from (both from what site they were on when they found you and where in the world they were located) and how long they are staying once they get there.
  • Clicky. This is a GA alternative that allows you to analyze what is working for you. It answers questions like how your efforts today compared to your efforts last week, what techniques are working best for you, and what pages grab the attention of your readers versus which ones are underperforming. It does all this in real time so you know the answers to your questions as they are occurring.

There are many other tools available to help you evaluate your analytics. Do some research and find the one that is right for you.

2. Know What Analytics to Evaluate. Now that you know how to use analytics, it is important to learn which ones are most important to you. This will partly depend on what your ultimate goal is (Is your main goal to build brand recognition? Fill out a form? Go to your site? Buy something?, etc.), but it will also partly be dictated by what each analysis means.

Say for example that your most recent Tweet resulted in the following analytics:

  • Re-tweets: 50
  • Favorites: 75
  • Click Throughs: 0

It would be easy to convince yourself that because you are getting a lot of favorites and retweets, you are being successful; however, your more important goal should be to get people to your site to learn about your content or to otherwise create a form of engagement that will help you meet your content goals. So if all you look at is the first two, while ignoring the third, you might be operating in a vacuum without even realizing it.

Make sure that a big part of your focus is on how many people are actually going to your links, navigating your site, staying for a while, and coming back and how many customer conversions you are getting from those clicks. That is much more important than likes and re-tweets.

4. Use Customized Tracking Links. If you pay attention to links like I do, you might notice that a link you expect to be simple (such as joesdinner.com) is unexpectedly complicated (joesdinner.com/ref+a#pqures&ltdoorehdsfhewoiryer – I just hit a bunch of random keys here, but I think you get the picture). What exactly are all those symbols and letters? It is likely the way the site is tracking links.

An important way to determine content success is to see where people are coming from when they come to you. Tracking links can help you evaluate if more users are coming from PPC ads, Google searches, Twitter, or bookmarks, to name a few.

There are many tools that can help you track links. I’ll let you know about my two favorites, but you can find others as well.

  • Majestic-SEO. This tool not only allows you to track your own links with customized anchor tabs, it also allows you to track some statistics from competitors.
  • Spredfast. This tool is great because it allows you to track your links, view analytics, and manage all of your social media accounts from one place.

4. Dust Yourself Off and Try Again (Or Rinse and Repeat). Now that you know how to analyze your ROI for content production, it is time to evaluate your success to date. Are your methods falling flat? Then maybe you should come up with a new action plan (i.e., dust yourself off and try again). If all of this analytics work has made you realize you are already doing a great job, congratulations! Now just keep doing it with all your new content (i.e., rinse and repeat.)

While there are many things you should be doing to accurately reflect your ROI for content production, using the above tips are great ways to start.

P.S. Here Are The Quiz Answers

  1. The bounce rate is the percentage of users who visit a site but do not click through (another important term) to other pages before leaving.
  2. Once you have a Google Analytics account, you can navigate to “your view,” select the reporting tag, and then click on audience > benchmarking.
  3. A funnel shows the path that a user took to reach a certain page. For example, a funnel might show that User A started on Twitter, clicked a link leading to your home page, then selected your blog, and finally picked a post on pet grooming.

Source

Bing joins Google in favoring mobile-friendly sites

Posted in News on 18 May 2015

Microsoft is adjusting how it ranks Bing search results for mobile users, prioritizing sites that display better on smaller screens to accommodate the increased use of mobile search.

The changes, announced Thursday, come less than a month after Google started prioritizing mobile-optimized sites in its search results. Both companies are looking to attract more users by providing a better search experience on smartphones and tablets.

Microsoft said it expects to roll out the changes in the coming months. Sites that display well on smaller screens will also be flagged with a new "mobile friendly" tag.

In the U.S. last year, Bing had roughly 6 percent of the mobile search market, compared with Google's 83 percent, according to figures from StatCounter.

The changes don't mean mobile-optimized sites will necessarily appear at the top of results. "You can always expect to see the most relevant results for a search query ranked higher, even if some of them are not mobile friendly," Microsoft said.

It considers a variety of elements to decide which sites display best on smartphones and tablets. For example, sites with large navigational elements that are spaced well apart will be prioritized, as well as sites that don't require a lot of zooming and lateral scrolling. Bing will also favor sites with mobile-compatible content. That means pages with Flash content, which doesn't work well on iOS devices, might get demoted.

Microsoft highlighted Fandango's mobile site as one that will be prioritized under the changes, more so than Movies.com.

The company has also developed a tool to help webmasters assess the mobile friendliness of their sites. It will be made available in a few weeks.

Source

Festival Ambassador

Posted in Volunteer Opportunities on 15 May 2015

Purpose of the role: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (GDIF) is London’s

leading festival of free outdoor performing arts (theatre, dance, and street arts), an annual

10-day celebration of extraordinary outdoor events that transform people's lives. GDIF2015 takes place from 26 June – 5 July.

GDIF is looking for enthusiastic volunteers to join the festival team, to make London’s annual festival of outdoor arts and spectacle a truly memorable event. We need volunteers to act as our ambassadors at the festival. As Festival Ambassador your main role will be to help audiences orient themselves around the eclectic range of performances available.

Main activities will be to:

 

·    Provide visitors and participants with information about our festival

 

·    Act as a Steward

 

·    Distribute and collect audience feedback forms

 

·    Be a friendly face for the public to approach

 

·    Enthuse and inform members of the public about the festival

 

·    Help to ensure that the festival is accessible to all by recognising and responding to

individual’s access needs

Role requirements:

We believe that volunteers are at the heart of the festival and the more upbeat and positive our volunteers, the more brilliant our festival will be.  The main thing we ask from our volunteers is that they are reliable, friendly, enthusiastic and have a good level of English to talk to the general public. An interest in the arts is desirable but not essential.

GDIF is committed to making the festival and volunteering opportunities as open and accessible as possible, and has a particular focus on working with Deaf and disabled artists

and audiences. So an awareness of/willingness of learn about access issues would be useful.

Please note all volunteers must be over 18 years old.

Training provision: Prior to the festival all volunteers will be given a full induction for their role and the relevant policies and procedures (including Health and Safety, Child Protection, Lost Children and Vulnerable People and Equal Opportunities).

Induction will take place on Monday 15 June, 6.30pm – 8pm in Greenwich.

Volunteers will be given full support and supervision throughout their volunteering period.

Location: The Festival takes place outdoors over a variety of sites in Greenwich and Tower Hamlets; Cutty Sark/Old Royal Naval College, Canary Wharf, Woolwich, Shooters Hill, Bethnal Green and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford.

Availability: If you’d like to get involved, you must be free to volunteer for at least 3 shifts between Friday 26 June and Sunday 5 July 2015.

Expenses: Travel and lunch expense will be reimbursed per day on presentation of receipt. There is a maximum of £10 for expenditure per day per person.

Registration: To register your interest in volunteering at GDIF2015, please complete our registration form at the following link.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/gdif2015volunteer

Deadline for completing the application form is Friday 22 May 2015 at 5pm.

Main point of contact: Daniel Mcdermott-Roe, our volunteer coordinator will be your main point of contact

If you are interested in this role, and have any queries you can contact Daniel on volunteer@festival.org or phone +44 (0)20 8305 5023 for further details.

For more information on the Greenwich+ Docklands International Festival please go to www.festival.org. Like us on facebook: GDIFestival and follow us on twitter: @GDIF for latest Festival news!

Purpose of the role: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (GDIF) is London’s

leading festival of free outdoor performing arts (theatre, dance, and street arts), an annual

10-day celebration of extraordinary outdoor events that transform people's lives. GDIF2015 takes place from 26 June – 5 July.

GDIF is looking for enthusiastic volunteers to join the festival team, to make London’s annual festival of outdoor arts and spectacle a truly memorable event. We need volunteers to act as our ambassadors at the festival. As Festival Ambassador your main role will be to help audiences orient themselves around the eclectic range of performances available.

Main activities will be to:

 

·    Provide visitors and participants with information about our festival

 

·    Act as a Steward

 

·    Distribute and collect audience feedback forms

 

·    Be a friendly face for the public to approach

 

·    Enthuse and inform members of the public about the festival

 

·    Help to ensure that the festival is accessible to all by recognising and responding to

individual’s access needs

Role requirements:

We believe that volunteers are at the heart of the festival and the more upbeat and positive our volunteers, the more brilliant our festival will be.  The main thing we ask from our volunteers is that they are reliable, friendly, enthusiastic and have a good level of English to talk to the general public. An interest in the arts is desirable but not essential.

GDIF is committed to making the festival and volunteering opportunities as open and accessible as possible, and has a particular focus on working with Deaf and disabled artists

and audiences. So an awareness of/willingness of learn about access issues would be useful.

Please note all volunteers must be over 18 years old.

Training provision: Prior to the festival all volunteers will be given a full induction for their role and the relevant policies and procedures (including Health and Safety, Child Protection, Lost Children and Vulnerable People and Equal Opportunities).

Induction will take place on Monday 15 June, 6.30pm – 8pm in Greenwich.

Volunteers will be given full support and supervision throughout their volunteering period.

Location: The Festival takes place outdoors over a variety of sites in Greenwich and Tower Hamlets; Cutty Sark/Old Royal Naval College, Canary Wharf, Woolwich, Shooters Hill, Bethnal Green and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford.

Availability: If you’d like to get involved, you must be free to volunteer for at least 3 shifts between Friday 26 June and Sunday 5 July 2015.

Expenses: Travel and lunch expense will be reimbursed per day on presentation of receipt. There is a maximum of £10 for expenditure per day per person.

Registration: To register your interest in volunteering at GDIF2015, please complete our registration form at the following link.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/gdif2015volunteer

Deadline for completing the application form is Friday 22 May 2015 at 5pm.

Main point of contact: Daniel Mcdermott-Roe, our volunteer coordinator will be your main point of contact

If you are interested in this role, and have any queries you can contact Daniel on volunteer@festival.org or phone +44 (0)20 8305 5023 for further details.

For more information on the Greenwich+ Docklands International Festival please go to www.festival.org. Like us on facebook: GDIFestival and follow us on twitter: @GDIF for latest Festival news!

 

Marketing Ambassador

Posted in Volunteer Opportunities on 15 May 2015

Purpose of the role: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (GDIF) is London’s

leading festival of free outdoor performing arts (theatre, dance, and street arts), an annual

10-day celebration of extraordinary outdoor events that transform people's lives. GDIF2015 takes place from 26th June – 5th July.

GDIF is looking for enthusiastic marketing volunteers to join the festival team, to make

London’s annual festival of outdoor arts and spectacle a truly memorable event.

We need volunteers to act as our marketing ambassadors at the festival. As Marketing

Ambassador your main role will be to inform audiences of and about the events. Main activities will be to

·    Distribute flyers around Greenwich (19th June – 26th June)

 

·    Man our information cabin prior to and during the festival (19th June – 29th June)

 

·    Assist with transport and installation of marketing signage

 

·    Be a friendly face for the public to approach

 

·    Enthusing and informing members of the public about the festival

 

*This role may require long periods of standing and lifting heavier loads

Role requirements: We believe that volunteers are at the heart of the festival and the more upbeat and positive our volunteers, the more brilliant our festival will be! The main thing we ask from our volunteers is that they are reliable, friendly, enthusiastic and have a good level of English to talk to the general public. An interest in the arts is desirable but not essential. Please let us know if you have experience in marketing or customer service. This is desirable but by no means essential.

Please note to undertake this role you must be over 18 years of age.

Training provision: Prior to the festival all volunteers will be given a full induction for their role and the relevant policies and procedures for the festival such as Health and Safety, Child Protection, Lost Children and Vulnerable People and Equal Opportunities.

Induction will take place on Monday 15 June, 6.30pm – 8pm in Greenwich.

Volunteers will be given full support and supervision throughout their volunteering period.

Location: The Festival takes place outdoors over a variety of sites in Greenwich and Tower Hamlets;  Cutty Sark/Old Royal Naval College, Canary Wharf, Woolwich, Shooters Hill, Bethnal Green and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford.

Availability: If you’d like to get involved, you must be free to volunteer for at least 3 shifts between Friday 19th June and Sunday 5th July 2015.

Expenses: Travel and lunch expense will be reimbursed per day on presentation of receipt. There is a maximum of £10 for expenditure per day per person.

Registration: To register your interest in volunteering at GDIF2015, please complete our registration form at the following link.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/gdif2015volunteer

Deadline for completing the application form is Friday 22nd May 2015 at 5pm.

Main point of contact: Daniel Mcdermott-Roe, our volunteer coordinator will be your main point of contact

If you are interested in this role, and have any queries you can contact Daniel on volunteer@festival.org or phone +44 (0)20 8305 5023 for further details.

For more information on the Greenwich+ Docklands International Festival please go to www.festival.org. Like us on facebook: GDIFestival and follow us on twitter: @GDIF for latest Festival news!

Performance Assistant

Posted in Volunteer Opportunities on 15 May 2015

Purpose of the role: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (GDIF) is London’s

leading festival of free outdoor performing arts (theatre, dance, and street arts), an annual

10-day celebration of extraordinary outdoor events that transform people's lives. GDIF2015 takes place from 26th June – 5th July.

GDIF is looking for enthusiastic volunteers to join the festival team, to make London’s annual

festival of outdoor arts and spectacle a truly memorable event.

As Performance Assistant your main role will be to provide practical support for shows during rehearsals and performances.

Main activities will be to:

 

·    Attend rehearsals and performances

 

·    Learn simple tasks that you need to repeat reliably within the performance

 

·    Assist with stewarding

Role requirements: To undertake this role you must be over 18 years of age. You must be able to attend all rehearsals and performances of the show you’re volunteering on. Good at learning and remembering tasks and timing, reliable, and able to relate to the public in a friendly and helpful way.

Training provision: Prior to the festival all volunteers will be given a full induction for their role and the relevant policies and procedures for the festival such as Health and Safety, Child Protection, Lost Children and Vulnerable People and Equal Opportunities. The induction will take place on Monday 15 June from 6.30pm – 8pm in Greenwich.

Volunteers will be given full support and supervision throughout their volunteering period.

Location: The Festival takes place outdoors over a variety of sites in Greenwich and Tower Hamlets;  Cutty Sark/Old Royal Naval College, Canary Wharf, Woolwich, Shooters Hill, Bethnal Green and Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford.

Availability: If you’d like to get involved, you must be free to volunteer for at least 3 shifts between Friday 26th June and Sunday 5th July 2015.

Expenses: Travel and lunch expense will be reimbursed per day on presentation of receipt. There is a maximum of £10 for expenditure per day per person.

Registration: To register your interest in volunteering at GDIF2015, please complete our registration form at the following link.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/gdif2015volunteer

Deadline for completing the application form is Friday 22nd May 2015 at 5pm.

Main point of contact: Daniel Mcdermott-Roe, our volunteer coordinator will be your main point of contact

If you are interested in this role, and have any queries you can contact Daniel on volunteer@festival.org or phone +44 (0)20 8305 5023 for further details.

For more information on the Greenwich+ Docklands International Festival please go to www.festival.org. Like us on facebook: GDIFestival and follow us on twitter: @GDIF for latest Festival news!

Artist Liaison

Posted in Volunteer Opportunities on 15 May 2015

Purpose of the role: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (GDIF) is London’s

leading festival of free outdoor performing arts (theatre, dance, and street arts), an annual

10-day celebration of extraordinary outdoor events that transform people's lives. GDIF2015 takes place from 26th June – 5th July.

GDIF is looking for enthusiastic volunteers to join the festival team, to make London’s annual festival of outdoor arts and spectacle a truly memorable event. The Artist Liaison Volunteers will join the GDIF team for the week running up to and including the festival period. The role will have a specific focus on artist liaison and administration.

Tasks will include:

·    Meeting and greeting artists (including international companies)

·    Assisting international companies in their local travel to and from sites

·    Administrating and distributing artist per diems in collaboration with the Festival

Administrator

·    Re-confirming hotel booking details in advance of artists’ arrivals in collaboration with

the Festival Administrator

·    Re-confirming internal travel booking details in advance of artists’ arrivals in

collaboration with the Festival Administrator

·    Assisting with the preparation of event paperwork

·    Assisting with the preparation of Artist Packs

·    Supporting the Festival Administrator and the Production Managers on site if requested

Role requirements: To undertake this role you will need to be someone who takes initiative and can think on their feet, is trustworthy and can approach situations with maturity. You will also need to be friendly and approachable. An interest in the arts is desirable but not essential. Knowledge of the Greenwich area a plus!

To undertake this role you must be over 18 years of age.

Training provision: All volunteers will be given a full induction for their role and the relevant policies and procedures for the festival. Volunteers will be given full support and supervision throughout their volunteering period.

Location: They will work closely with our Festival Administrator, based within the Greenwich office but travelling across London as necessary for different tasks.

Availability: If you’d like to get involved, you must be free to volunteer between Wednesday

17th June to Sunday 5th July 2015.

Expenses: Travel and lunch expense will be reimbursed per day on presentation of receipt. There is a maximum of £10 for expenditure per day per person.

Registration: To register your interest in volunteering at GDIF2015, please complete our registration form at the following link.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/gdif2015volunteer

Deadline for completing the application form is Friday 22nd May 2015 at 5pm.

Main point of contact: Daniel Mcdermott-Roe, our volunteer coordinator will be your main point of contact

If you are interested in this role, and have any queries you can contact Daniel on volunteer@festival.org or phone +44 (0)20 8305 5023 for further details.

For more information on the Greenwich+ Docklands International Festival please go to www.festival.org. Like us on facebook: GDIFestival and follow us on twitter: @GDIF for latest Festival news!

Addicted to Candy Crush Saga? Marketing needs you

Posted in News on 15 May 2015

If you’ve just returned to the media marketing profession, from a decade-long hiatus, you may find it bewildering terrain. The fact that you originate from the industry will be an advantage, but throw Candy Crush Saga into the interests section of your CV and you’ve just scored yourself a hat-tip.

Today’s model media marketing team accompanies customers along every twist and turn of the consumer journey, shepherding both those who entered through a marketing channel and those inherited from another starting point. And they are no longer the simple cost centre of a decade ago. Today’s media marketing team will have at least a substantial revenue, or profit, target.

To squeeze efficiency from marketing budgets, ideally, one marketing team begins the customer journey, focusing on brand awareness and engagement, after which the customer is handed over to the next tag-team who specialise in, say, content marketing, to more deeply engage them. Yet another marketing team may take over from here, encouraging customers to make a purchase and, later in their lifecycle, to others who look after retention, upsell and additional opportunities for revenue.

This understanding of the customer, their journey, and their experience of that journey, is paramount. Marketers are, therefore, starting to specialise in those specific functions along the user journey. Throw in customer experience expertise, to make sure that each of these stages is optimised for maximum impact, and what that leads to is higher customer retention and loyalty rates, with greater lifetime value and repeat purchasing.

Responsibility for hitting profit targets means marketing departments need analytical minds just as badly as they need creatives. Because of this shift in demand, a surprising sector has emerged as a pool for new talent: online gaming. Online gaming marketers possess a skill-set that baffles traditional publishers – and almost everyone else, too. With their algorithms and models, they seem to instinctively know how to generate revenue digitally, and estimate within a few days, if not hours, how much a new customer will spend.

The ability to read data, understand its commercial implications, and then make refinements to campaigns that are running in order to optimise response, is critical. At the Economist, our global digital acquisition team have a mantra: “Pursue determinedly. Measure relentlessly. Optimise ruthlessly.”

Other industries that produce these kinds of digitally-minded marketers include mobile-phone companies and cable and satellite TV companies, such as Sky. This is largely because they mine effectively large quantities of data to gain insights into how their customers interact with their products and how their customers respond to their marketing initiatives. Why is this important? Because by understanding how customers interact with, and use, your products, you can drive product development to create further revenue opportunities from existing clients, as well as attract new ones.

Someone has to build these complex digital ecosystems and that’s something a ping-pong table and a slide between floors won’t help with. Media marketing teams now create campaigns that combine social media, in-app advertising, website interactions and offline advertising, and they require extremely skilled and responsive technologists and data analysts.

So where has all the creativity gone? Often the work is outsourced to external creative agencies, who are better specialised, and the modern marketer must be open to collaboration. The creativity that marketers require, instead, is in how they optimise marketing channels and how they can use technology to do so.

What the consumer marketing world is trying to achieve, on a massive scale, is the care and attention that business-to-business marketers are able to offer their clients. This more personalised approach is the end goal for any business with a very large customer base, especially given the rising costs of acquisition.

With marketers expected to bring in revenue alongside a company’s more traditional revenue streams, recruiters realise that not just any old marketer will do. Marketing training courses are, thankfully, changing to meet new demands. They include more about the intersection of tech and marketing, and digital marketing. Missing, however, are the analytical, and mathematical, training modules that new marketing requires. Take note.

Meanwhile, that someone who stepped away from their desk for a decade may have a lot of work ahead of them to catch up with a newly diversified herd. But, the reward is a profession, more highly regarded than ever before.

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